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Credit Programs for Part-time Students

History

HIST 127: American History to 1865

Offered Fall semester 2014 (august 19-December 12)

This is a general survey course of American history from the earliest days of European contact to the conclusion of the Civil War. We will study and discuss the evolution of the American colonies and the subsequent nation building (and refining) that occurred throughout the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Emphasis will be placed on the most vital political, economic, and social events of the period. This first half of America’s history might, at first glance, seem to have little significance for the everyday lives of contemporary citizens. As we progress through the course, however, it will become apparent that this period is not at all remote. With this thought in mind, you and your classmates will be encouraged to find personal connections between your own life experiences and those of the Americans living in earlier times. Many of the ties will be found in your reading, but you will also supplement these materials with information that you glean from the Internet.

Required Texts

  • Murrin et al., Liberty, Equality, and Power: A History of the American People, Volume I: To 1877, 6th edition. ISBN 978-0495915874.
  • Davidson and Lytle, After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection, Volume I, 6th edition. ISBN 978-0077292683

You may purchase the materials at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Joey Fink, MA
  • Department: History
  • Credit hours: 3
  • View course syllabus.

link How to Enroll

HIST 128: American History Since 1865

Offered Fall semester 2014 (august 19-December 12)

This course is a general survey of the nation's history from the era of Reconstruction (immediately following the Civil War) to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the significant political and economic events of the period, as well as on changes in the American social and cultural landscape. The course is structured around themes that professional historians have deemed important, but you will be encouraged (in fact required) to find personal connections between your own life experiences and those of the Americans who came before you. Many of these vital connections will be found in the course's assigned materials (especially in the original source documents), but you and your classmates will also locate materials as you explore the Internet.

Required Texts

  • Boyer et al., The Enduring Vision, Volume II, 7th edition ISBN: 978-0495799986.
  • Lorence, Enduring Voices, Volume II, 4th edition (1996)
  • CD (contains a series of short lectures by scholars associated with UNC-Chapel Hill)

You may purchase the materials at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

HIST 140: The World Since 1945

Offered Fall semester 2014 (august 19-December 12)

This introduction to the contemporary world examines the Cold War and its international aftermath, decolonization, national development across a variety of cases, and trends in the global economy.

Required Materials

  • Hunt, The World Transformed: 1945 to the Present (2003), ISBN 978-0312245832
  • Césaire, Discourse on Colonialism (2001), ISBN 978-1583670255

You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

HIST 151: European History to 1650

Offered Fall semester 2014 (august 19-December 12)

HIST 151 surveys the history of Western civilization from its earliest roots in the Ancient Near East to its “early modern” manifestations in seventeenth-century Europe.

Required Materials

  • Chambers, et al., The Western Experience, Vol. 1, 10th edition (2010), ISBN 978-0077291174
  • Keith Bradley, Slavery and Society at Rome (1994), ISBN 978-0521378871
  • Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre (1983), ISBN 978-0674766914
  • Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince (1995), 978-0872203167

You must purchase the edition indicated by the ISBN. You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

HIST 276: The Modern Middle East

Offered Fall semester 2014 (august 19-December 12)

This course introduces students to the recent history of the Middle East and compares the Middle East to the United States.

Required Textbooks

  • Cleveland and Bunton, A History of the Modern Middle East 4th Ed. (2008). ISBN: 978-0-8133-43747
  • Dawisha, Arab Nationalism in the Twentieth Century: From Triumph to Despair (2003). ISBN: 0-691-122725
  • Gelvin, The Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know (2012). [ISBN: 978-0199891771]
  • Mahfouz, Miramar. Trans. Fatma Moussa Mahmoud (1992) [orig. 1967]. ISBN: 978-0385264785
  • The Islamic Revolution at 30: Middle East Report (MERIP) 250 (Spring 2009). No ISBN, can be purchased at merip.org/mer/mer250.

You may purchase all the textbooks except The Islamic Revolution at 30: Middle East Report at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

HIST 367: North Carolina History Since 1865

Offered Fall semester 2014 (august 19-December 12)

This course covers the history of North Carolina after the Civil War.

Required Textbooks

  • North Carolina: Change and Tradition in a Southern State. William A. Link. Wheeling, IL: Harlan Davidson, 2009
  • The North Carolina Century: Tar Heels Who Made a Difference, 1900–2000, H.E. Covington, Jr., and M.A. Ellis, eds. Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 2002
  • Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World, J.D. Hall, J. Leloudis, R. Korstad, M. Murphy, L.A. Jones, C.R. Daly. Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 2000
  • Sorting Out the New South City: Race, Class, and Urban Development in Charlotte, 1875–1975, T.W. Hanchett. Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 1998
  • Schooling the New South: Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880–1920. J.L. Leloudis. Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 1996
  • HIST 367 Course Pack.

You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll